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The best satellite internet providers of 2021

ProviderViasatHughesNet
Data12–300 GB/mo.10–50 GB/mo.
Speeds12-100 MbpsUp to 25 Mbps
Price$30.00–$150.00/mo.*$39.99– $149.99/mo.
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Call 855-317-9185 855-317-9185

Actual speeds may vary and are not guaranteed. *Promotional price is for the first 3 months. Regular internet rate applies after 3 months ($50–$200/mo.). Service plans require a 24-month commitment.

Viasat, HughesNet, and Starlink are the three main satellite internet providers in the US. Viasat offers generous monthly data, HughesNet offers low prices, and Starlink has the potential for offering the fastest speeds. We'll help you choose which satellite internet provider is best for you.

For the best satellite internet speeds, we recommend Viasat’s Unlimited Platinum 100 plan. Priced at $150 per month for the first three months, this plan includes 300 gigabytes (GB) of priority (high-speed) data per month, and thereafter, unlimited data at reduced speeds.

Best satellite internet plans for rural areas

Most recommended: Viasat Unlimited Platinum 100
Viasat
• Price: $150/mo.*
• Download speed: Up to 100 Mbps
• Data threshold: 300 GB/mo.
Best for basics: Viasat Unlimited Gold 50
Viasat
• Price: $99.99/mo.*
• Download speed: 50 Mbps
• Data threshold: 200 GB/mo.

*Promotional price is for the first 3 months. Regular internet rate applies after 3 months. Actual speeds may vary and are not guaranteed.

Satellite Internet Reviews and Plans

Viasat

With generous data allowances up to 300 GB per month, Viasat is a reliable choice for home internet in rural areas. Viasat speeds reach 100 Mbps in many locations.

HughesNet

HughesNet has the biggest customer base of any satellite provider, serving a million rural homes across America. HughesNet speeds can hit 25 Mbps, and data allowances top out at 50 GB per month.

Starlink

Starlink is available in limited areas, although you must join a six month waiting list. Speeds range from 50–150 Mbps. The upfront cost for equipment is $499, but monthly service is reasonably priced at $99 for unlimited data.

Comparing the Best Satellite Internet Plans

PlanViasat Unlimited Platinum 100Hughesnet 50 GBStarlink beta
Data Limit300 GB/mo.10-50 GB/mo.Unlimited
SpeedsUp to 100 MbpsUp to 25 Mbps50-150 Mbps
Wait ListNoNoYes
Price$149.99/mo.*$149.99/mo.$99/mo.
Get it

Actual speeds may vary and are not guaranteed. *Promotional price is for the first 3 months. Regular internet rate applies after 3 months ($50–$200/mo.). †Service plans require a 24-month commitment.

A side-by-side comparison of the three residential satellite internet providers shows that  HughesNet plans deliver the slowest speeds and the least priority (full-speed) data overall. But, HughesNet is more reliable than Starlink (which cuts out periodically because there aren’t enough satellites to ensure 24/7 coverage yet). Viasat’s Platinum 100 plan comes out as the winner overall.

Pros and cons of satellite internet

Pros
Pro Bullet Availability: Satellite internet is available almost everywhere in the US. That makes it an great for rural areas.
Pro Bullet Speed: Satellite internet is usually faster than DSL or dial-up internet, but it’s not as fast as fiber or cable internet.
Pro Bullet Flexibility: Satellite internet performs well for typical internet usage like browsing, email, and even occasional video streaming (just watch that data cap).
Cons
Con Bullet Data Caps: Most satellite internet plans come with a limited allotment of data. After you reach that data cap, your internet speed will slow down.
Con Bullet Latency: Sending information to space and back takes some extra time, making it impossible to play PvP (player versus player) games.
Con Bullet Cost: The average cost of satellite internet (around $100 per month) is higher than other types of internet. Although there are some low priced satellite plans, these options offer very limited data that won’t work for most households.

What is satellite internet, anyway?

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